27th September 1884 - bomb explodes near Salisbury Guildhall

Explosion in SalisburyOn 27th September 1884 another home-made bomb exmploded in Salisbury[1].

Historian TJ Northey writes:

A third, and even more serious outrage of this kind, was committed on the night of September 27th (a Saturday) of the same year. Shortly before eleven o’clock, just as tradesmen were closing their shops, and when only a comparatively few loiterers were in the streets, people in the neighbourhood of the Council Chamber were startled by the sounds of a terrific explosion.

This time, too, investigation showed that some explosive machine had been used, the chemical, whatever it was, having been enclosed in a canister, which was shattered to pieces.

It had been placed on the platform in the recess to the left of the Council Chamber, on wliich the Russian Gun stands, and the force of the explosion had been sufficient, not only to slightly damage the exterior of that end of the building, but to smash fourteen panes of glass in the banqueting room, whilst windows were also broken on the premises of Mr. Gould and Mr. Horder, in Queen Street.

Colonel Ford, Chief Government Inspector of Explosives, made a personal investigation on the spot, and it turned out that the material that had been used was merely coarse blasting powder - a fact which did not, however, minimise the seriousness of the offence.

A reward of £200 was offered for the apprehension of the offenders[2]

Image Credits

The picture has nothing to do with Salisbury or dynamite. It’s a detail from an illustration from Jules Verne’s novel “Around the Moon” drawn by Émile-Antoine Bayard and Alphonse de Neuville.

Attribution: Henri Théophile Hildibrand [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Footnotes

[1] The Popular History Of Old & New Sarum. T. J. Northy, Published by the Wiltshire County Mirror & Express Co. Ltd., 1897. Available digitally on the Internet Archive - URL: https://archive.org/stream/popularhistoryof00nort/popularhistoryof00nort_djvu.txt.

[2] The Popular History Of Old & New Sarum. T. J. Northy, Published by the Wiltshire County Mirror & Express Co. Ltd., 1897. Available digitally on the Internet Archive - URL: https://archive.org/stream/popularhistoryof00nort/popularhistoryof00nort_djvu.txt.

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