29th July 1625 - Salisbury Council acts to keep out the Plague

On 29th July 1625 steps were taken to stop people infected with the Plague coming to Salisbury[1].

TJ Northey wrote this:

In accordance with custom on such sad occasions the governing bodies of the city took rigorous steps to prevent strangers bringing the plague into Salisbury.

At a meeting of the mayor and justices, held on 29th July, 1625, it was decided to strengthen the watch and ward of the city, and men, bearing halberts[2], were appointed to stand one at each of the entrances into Salisbury.

The watchmen and warders had orders to allow no strangers to lodge or stay in the city unless they could prove that they had not come from London, or any other infected quarter; and if any such desired to pass through the town they were to be conducted by the warders or watchmen by way of the “ utmost streets,” and not to be allowed to enter any inn or house, or to stay in the streets.

Any Salisbury person who chanced to be in London during the time of the plague was forbidden to enter his city within three months after returning to these parts, having to stay outside for a three months’ quarantine, as we might now express it. No one (save the owners or those set to watch the property) was allowed to go near any goods that had come from London, and which happened to be lying outside Salisbury, on pain of imprisonment ; and the city carrier was ordered not to bring London goods any nearer Salisbury than Three Mile Hill[3].

Householders were ordered to permit no one to enter their houses who had been in London within a month prior to their coming hither ; and any residents offending in this way were not to be allowed to stir out of their houses, either themselves or their guests, except upon the licence of the mayor or the magistrates.

Watchmen, too, were warned against drinking or fraternising in any way with Londoners or other prohibited persons. [4].

Tags: #medical #nopic

Footnotes

[1] The Popular History Of Old & New Sarum. T. J. Northy, Published by the Wiltshire County Mirror & Express Co. Ltd., 1897. Available digitally on the Internet Archive - URL: https://archive.org/stream/popularhistoryof00nort/popularhistoryof00nort_djvu.txt.

[2] A ‘halbert’ or, I think, ‘halberd’ is a big club, also used in making cloth

[3] Three Mile Hill is on Salisbury Plain

[4] The Popular History Of Old & New Sarum. T. J. Northy, Published by the Wiltshire County Mirror & Express Co. Ltd., 1897. Available digitally on the Internet Archive - URL: https://archive.org/stream/popularhistoryof00nort/popularhistoryof00nort_djvu.txt

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