15th October - King Charles enters Salisbury with army

On 15th October ???, King Charles entered Salisbury with an army. People in Salisbury had been dreading a battle between Cromwell’s Roundheads and the King’s Forces in or around Salisbury[1]. The anticipated battle did not occur, either in Salisbury or at Andover which seemed the next liekly location.

The historian TJ Northy tells the story:

Towards the end of the month of September great terror and alarm were experienced by the inhabitants of the city, who were dreading at any moment a collision and terrible onslaught between the royalist and parliamentary forces, who were advancing in this direction in large numbers from different quarters.

Waller, with his force, had marched from Shaftesbury, and taken up his quarters at Winterbourne Stoke, afterwards moving on to Andover, across the Plain, to avoid contact with the numerically superior forces of the king, having failed to effect a junction with the troops of Essex and Manchester. 

The king, on the way from Dorsetshire to his winter quarters at Oxford, slept at Cranbourne on the 14th October, and the next day entered Salisbury at the head of his army. 

Charles having learnt of the movements of his enemies, resolved to follow and attack Waller at Andover. He first of all put a hundred men in garrison at Longford House (now Longford Castle), leaving the greater portion of his ordnance and heavy baggage there. Orders were given that no one should leave the city without the royal permission, so that information could not be sent to Waller, and other precautionary measures" were taken. 

The next morning the king and his troops marched along the London-road (which then passed through Milford Hollow) to Clarendon, which he reached at seven o'clock. Four hours later he was joined by Prince Rupert, who had come on from Wilton. The march to Andover was commenced about noon, but when the royal army was about four miles distant from that town Waller became aware of their approach, and having left a few troops behind to cover his retreat, quitted the locality with all speed. 

The great battle which it was anticipated would take place at Andover did not transpire, and beyond the loss of a few lives in a skirmish between the advance guard of the king and the rear guard of the parliamentarians no loss was sustained<a name="Source2" href="#Note2">[2]</a></blockquote>.

Footnotes

[1] The Popular History Of Old & New Sarum. T. J. Northy, Published by the Wiltshire County Mirror & Express Co. Ltd., 1897. Available digitally on the Internet Archive - URL: https://archive.org/stream/popularhistoryof00nort/popularhistoryof00nort_djvu.txt.

[2] The Popular History Of Old & New Sarum. T. J. Northy, Published by the Wiltshire County Mirror & Express Co. Ltd., 1897. Available digitally on the Internet Archive - URL: https://archive.org/stream/popularhistoryof00nort/popularhistoryof00nort_djvu.txt.

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