The railway trip from Bath to Salisbury is beautiful. This page lists some of the stuff you can see along the way.

The journey takes about an hour and twenty minutes.

From Bath Spa station you travel down through the Avon Valley to Bradford on Avon.

After Bradford on Avon you go on through Trowbridge, Westbury and Warminster, and then down the Wylye Valley to Salisbury.

I’ve added a small amount of detail here – there’s much more to come.

Bath to Bradford on Avon

On the left, just before you turn right into the Avon Valley, you can see Little Solsbury Hill, which Peter Gabriel sung of in his 1977 hit. In the song he climbs up on Solsbury Hill and looks down upon the city lights, the city being Bath.

The song has often been interpreted as a reflection on Gabriel leaving his band Genesis.

Bradford on Avon to Trowbridge

Trowbridge is the county town of Wiltshire.

Trowbridge to Westbury

As you approach Westbury, you can see the two things for which the town is famous:

  • The Chimney
  • The White Horse

Westbury to Warminster

As you approach Westbury, you can see Cley Hill on your right. It’s a distinctive hill – almost half-spherical in shape. There are many stories and traditions surrounding Cley Hill. This is a favourite.

Well, zur, it wer like this ye zee; the ‘Vizes volk had offended the devil mainly, an’ a swore ‘ad zar ‘em out. So a went down the country, an’ a vound a gert hump, an’a putt it on’s back an’ a carried along to vling at ‘em. An’ a come along be Warminster, an’ a met a m an, an’ a zays to un: “Can ‘ee tell I the rhoad to the Vizes?” ‘an t’other zaid “Lor ther now, that’s just what I do want to know myself, for I started for un when my beard wer black, an’ now as gray, an’ I hant got there yet”.
“Lor,” says the Devil (t’wer the Devil ye knaw) “if that’s how ’tis, I beant gwine to car thick no vurder, so here goes”; an’ a vling thuck gurt hump off’s shoulder, an’ thur a be, look zee, an that’s how Cley Hill got there.[1]

Warminster to Salisbury

Just after passing through Wilton, there is a railway siding that leads to the chalk works. The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh slept in the Royal Train while it was parked in the siding after she visited Salisbury in 2012.

Footnotes

  1. Cley Hill | Folklore by Rhiannon | The Modern Antiquarian.com []

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