Wyndham Road and Wyndham Terrace, Salisbury

Wyndham Road is to the north of Salisbury City Centre. It is named after the Wyndham family who, owned what is now known as ‘The Council House’ and the surrounding land.

The Wyndhams were a prominent aristocratic family in the West of England from the 1520s1 until the 20th Century2.

Wadham Wyndham

The Wyndhams’ association with the area around Wyndham Road began with Sir Wadham Wyndham, who bought ‘Saint Edmunds College’ in 1660, renaming it as ‘Wyndham House’3. His son William I Wyndham bought Dinton Manor in 16894…explaining why both Salisbury5 and Dinton6 have pubs called the Wyndham Arms.

SirWadWynd1609 1668 Image: By John Michael Wright [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Henry Wyndham

Sir Wadham Wyndham died in 1736 and his son Henry Wyndham inherited the estate7. I haven’t found out much about Henry Wyndham, other than that he was a member of ‘the Deptford Club’, who seemed to control the parliamentary constituency of Wiltshire8.

Henry Penruddock Wyndham

Henry Wyndham died in 1768, and his son Henry Penruddock Wyndham0 inherited. ‘Pen’ Wyndham was Mayor of Salisbury from 1768 until 17719, then Sheriff of Wiltshire, before becoming a Whig MP for Salisbury in 1795. He remained an MP until 1812.

‘Penruddock’ and ‘Wyndham’

The names ‘Penruddock Wyndham’ has an interesting history.

Henry Penruddock Wyndham’s mother was Arundel Ashe Wyndham, her maiden name being Penruddock. Her father was Thomas Pendruddock. Thomas’ father was also Thomas, an MP for Wilton. The MP’s father was John Penruddock10.

John Penruddock led the Sealed Knot conspiracy against Oliver Cromwell. Penruddock’s men occupied Salisbury in March of 1655 but his rebellion failed and he was ultimately be-headed in Exeter in May of he same year.

Henry Penruddock Wyndham’s father was, as we have seen, Henry Wyndham. Henry’s father was Wadham Wyndham. Wadham’s father was another Wadham, Sir Wadham Wyndham. Sir Wadham Wyndham was the son of Sir John Wyndham of Orchard Wyndham in Somerset.

Sir John Wyndham had a brother called Sir Hugh Wyndham11, who was a judge. He was the Judge in the Case of what would have presumably been called the Commonwealth vs John Penruddock, and was the man who sentenced Penruddock to death.

So, HP Wyndham’s great-great-great-great uncle sentenced great-great-grandfather to death.

I may have missed out a couple of ‘greats’ here.

Political career

According to the History of Parliament Online

Wyndham at first gave an independent support to administration, unless he was the Wyndham who opposed them on the question of war aims, 10 May 1796, and voted for Pitt’s assessed taxes, 4 Jan. 1798.

He opposed the abolition of the slave trade, 15 Mar. 1796. He was regarded as a supporter of Addington in May 1804, a doubtful Addingtonian in September and listed as ‘doubtful Pitt-ite’ by administration in July 1805.

He had joined opposition on the Duke of Atholl’s claims, 7 June, and on the prosecution of Melville, 12 June. The Whigs described him as being ‘against the Opposition’ when he rallied to ministers on the address and Scheldt inquiry, 23 Jan., 23 Feb. and 5 Mar. 1810.

His lack of interest in public affairs and infrequent attendance caused comment in the county and he deemed it prudent to retire in 1812. He is not known to have contributed to debate. According to his scathing critic the radical Henry Hunt ‘even in his youthful days he was no better in the House of Commons than an old woman12’.

Art-y stuff

Henry Penruddock Wyndham was also a geographer and historian, publishing ‘A Gentleman’s Tour through Monmouthshire and Wales’, ‘Wiltshire, Extracted from the Domesday Book’ and the ‘Diary of the Late George Bubb Dodington’13. He was also a friend of the artist JMW Turner, who painted ‘The ancient arch in Mr Wyndham’s garden, Salisbury’14

The arch is a 15th Century porch from Salisbury Cathedral. It’s in the South East corner of the Council Grounds - the bit closest to Kelsey Hill. The porch was moved to the Wyndham estate in 1791

Wadham Penruddock Wyndham

Wadham Penruddock Wyndham (16 October 1773 - 23 October 1843) followed on from his father as a Member of Parliament.

He went to school at Eton, then served in both the Wiltshire Yeomanry and the Wiltshire Militia.

He was elected Member of Parliament for Salisbury in 1818 and served, with a two-year gap in the 1830s until his death in 1843. He was Mayor of Wilton from 1825 to 1826[^16].

John Campbell-Wyndham

Wadham Penruddock Wyndham had no children.

After his death in 1843, John Campbell-Wyndham (26 July 1798 - 16 November 1868) succeeded him as Member of Parliament for Salisbury.

John Campbell-Wyndham has been known as John Henry Campbell. His mother was Caroline Wyndham.

I don’t know for sure whether John Campbell-Wyndham occupied Wyndham House, but his original surname might explain the name of Campbell Road, which is close to Wyndham Road.

John Campbell Wyndham did not stand for re-election in 1847. He was the last of the Wyndhams to represent Salisbury15

From the Wyndhams to Reverend Bourne to the Corporation of Salisbury

Following the death of John Campbell-Wyndham, Wyndham House and Wyndham Park ‘reverted to the trustees of the will of Wadham Wyndham III who put the property up for auction’16. In 1871 the House and the Grounds were sold to Robert Futcher, a local builder.

Robert Futcher built houses in most of what had been Wyndham Park, and sold Wyndham House and some of the grounds to Reverend George Bourne in 187317 - hence ‘Bourne Hill’, the road that separates the Greencroft from the Council Grounds.

The Reverend Bourne used the House as a college for some years. It was eventually purchased by the Corporation of Salisbury in 192718.

Footnotes and references

All Geni website, Link: Family Tree & Family History at Geni.com. All retrieved 03 December 2019 All Geni website, Link: Family Tree & Family History at Geni.com. All retrieved 03 December 2019


  1. The Wyndhams were originally from Norfolk - the first Wyndham to move west was John Wyndham, who married Elizabeth Sydenham of Orchard Sydenham in Somerset in 1528. ‘Orchard Sydenham’ later became ‘Orchard Wyndham’. See John Wyndham (died 1573) - Wikipedia [return]
  2. There is a book by Claudia Renton called ‘Those Wild Wyndhams’ about three sisters Mary, Madeline and Pamela who were painted by John Singer Sargent in 1899. They lived in Clouds House, which remained in the family until the 1920s.

    The book is reviewed in the Spectator by Pamela Wyndham’s great-grandson, Simon Blow. His mother and grandmother were photographed for Vogue by Cecil Beaton

    Simon Blow, “My family’s better days”, The Spectator, 18 January 2014, Link: https://www.spectator.co.uk/2014/01/the-wild-wyndhams-by-claudia-renton-review. Retrieved: 27 November 2019 [return]
  3. Wessex Archaeology, (2011), “The Council House Gardens At Bourne Hill, Salisbury, Wiltshire - Conservation Management Plan” (PDF), Link: https://www.wessexarch.co.uk/sites/default/files/74980-cmp-ver-02-210311.pdf, Page 6. Retrieved: 27 November 2019 [return]
  4. Wikipedia contributors, “Dinton, Wiltshire,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinton,_Wiltshire. Retieved 27 November 2019 [return]
  5. “Wyndham Arms - 27 Estcourt Road, Salisbury, Wiltshire, SP1 3AS: The Good Pub Guide”, “The Good Pub Guide”, Link: https://thegoodpubguide.co.uk/pub/sp1+3as/wyndham+arms/. Retrieved 27 November 2019 [return]
  6. “Wyndham Arms in Dinton (near Salisbury) : Pubs Galore”, Link: https://www.pubsgalore.co.uk/pubs/73346/. Retrieved: 02 December 2019 [return]
  7. Wessex Archaeology, (2011), “The Council House Gardens At Bourne Hill, Salisbury, Wiltshire - Conservation Management Plan” (PDF), Link: https://www.wessexarch.co.uk/sites/default/files/74980-cmp-ver-02-210311.pdf, Page 6. Retrieved: 27 November 2019 [return]
  8. The History of Parliament Online says that:

    Control of the representation was in the hands of a small group of gentry, who, with some of the peers, formed the Deptford Club. The families of Wyndham, Penruddocke, Long, Lambert, Goddard, and Awdry were prominent; among the peerage, Lords Bruce, Radnor, Castlehaven, and Shelburne. The Club, which was said to have been in existence as early as 1729, met in private when there was a vacancy, and agreed upon a candidate. Henry Wyndham described such a meeting in 1767:1

    “The first meeting that was to name a gentleman for the county was at the Deptford Inn, the Club. My brother Penruddocke was talked for this year, as also Mr. Talbot. Both of which in person and letter declined. Then they would have named my nephew, but the father objected to him as not being settled. The next was Thomas Goddard of Swindon, to whom we sent an express immediately. … The same express went also to our friends in London, who approved of him and then a meeting was appointed at Marlborough, where was between two and three hundred gentlemen.”

    The public meeting then ratified the Club’s choice. This kind of preliminary discussion took place in other counties when there was a vacancy: what renders the Wiltshire Club unique is that the arrangement had taken permanent shape. The influence of the Club was, moreover, so extensive that opposition was fruitless.
    ed. L. Namier, J. Brooke., (1964), “Wiltshire | History of Parliament Online”, Link: https://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1754-1790/constituencies/wiltshire. Retrieved: 02 December 2019

    [return]
  9. Wikipedia puts his mayoral dates as 1770 to 1771 Wikipedia contributors, “Henry Penruddocke Wyndham - Wikipedia”, Wikipedia. Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Penruddocke_Wyndham. Retrieved: 02 December 2019

    [return]
  10. I deduced the maternal branch of HP Wyndham’s family tree from the following pages on www.geni.com: [return]
  11. HP Wyndham’s paternal line also comes from www.geni.com: [return]
  12. WYNDHAM, Henry Penruddocke (1736-1819), of St. Edmund’s College, Salisbury, Wilts. | History of Parliament Online [return]
  13. Wikipedia contributors, “Henry Penruddocke Wyndham - Wikipedia”, Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Penruddocke_Wyndham. Retrieved: 03 December 2019 [return]
  14. The painting is on the British Museum website here: ‘The ancient arch in Mr Wyndham’s garden, Salisbury’, Turner, J. M. W. (1775-1851) | The British Museum Images [return]
  15. Myself/Wikipedia contributors, “Members of Parliament for Salisbury”, Link: http://salisburyandstonehenge.net/stuff/membersofparliament/. Retrieved: 04 December 2019 [return]
  16. Historic England, “Bourne Hill House Gardens, Salisbury - 1001700 | Historic England”, Link: https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1001700. Retrieved: 04 December 2019 [return]
  17. Historic England, “Bourne Hill House Gardens, Salisbury - 1001700 | Historic England”, Link: https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1001700. Retrieved: 04 December 2019 [return]
  18. Wessex Archaeology, (2011), “The Council House Gardens At Bourne Hill, Salisbury, Wiltshire - Conservation Management Plan” (PDF), Link: https://www.wessexarch.co.uk/sites/default/files/74980-cmp-ver-02-210311.pdf, Page 6. Retrieved: 27 November 2019 [return]