York Road SP2

The Duke of York Pub in Salisbury's York Road
York Road was probably built in the 1870s[1]. The Duke of York pub still stands in York Road, so I think the road is named after one of the Dukes of York. The Duke of York Pub in Salisbury's York RoadYork Road was probably built in the 1870s[1]. The Duke of York pub still stands in York Road, so I think the road is named after one of the Dukes of York.

This is an image This is an image It’s not clear whether any particular Duke of York inspired the name of the pub. The ‘fifth creation’ of the Dukedom ended in 1685, and the ‘sixth creation’ didn’t begin until the future George V became Duke of York in 1892[2]

Picture

The Duke of York Pub in Salisbury, by Chris Talbot [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Footnotes

[1] The Victoria County of History says that:

By 1860 Windsor Road and Windsor Street, both consisting of terraces of smaller houses, were built, and similar development south of Fisherton Street (Dew’s Road and adjoining roads) followed the conveyance in 1861 of lands belonging to the Hayter Trustees to Charles Dew, a Salisbury solicitor. Churchfields Road was partially built by 1864. Further development east of Wilton Road followed the closing of the county gaol in 1870; by 1879 part of its site, bounded by Gas Lane, Meadow Road, and St. Paul’s Road, had been built with terraces of small houses, and these were extended east to Middleton Road by the 1890’s.

‘Salisbury: The expansion of the city; Milford’, in A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 6, ed. Elizabeth Crittall (London, 1962), pp. 90-93. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/wilts/vol6/pp90-93 [accessed 7 March 2017].

[2] Duke of York. (2017, March 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:50, March 9, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Duke_of_York&oldid=768471089:w